Northern CT

Northern CT

Schoolhouse Brook Park, Storrs

251 Clover Mill Rd
Storrs  Connecticut  06268
United States

Easy

20%

Moderate

55%

Difficult

25%

Description

At 457 acres Schoolhouse Brook Park, owned and managed by the town of Mansfield, is a great place to ride and explore. It contains two ponds, Bicentennial and Barrows. There's swimming, canoeing, hiking, picnicking and many miles of excellent trails to mountain bike on.

Some of the trails are easy but many are technical in nature with rock features and numerous ridge lines.

This is a great park to bring your family, especially if some of its members would prefer to swim or picnic while others go for a ride.

For those of you who've never been here it would be a great introduction to the local trails.

 

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Northern CT

Mansfield Hollow State Park

151 Bassetts Bridge Rd
Mansfield Center  Connecticut  06250
United States

(860) 424-3200

Easy

30%

Moderate

60%

Difficult

10%

Description

At 500 acres Mansfield Hollow State Park consists of a large lake that's used for boating and fishing. There's no swimming since the lake is part of a local water supply.

The trails at Mansfield Hollow are generally fast and rolling. They're fun to ride and a good place to bring kids or newer riders.

The maps above show most, but not all of the trails.

 

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Northern CT

Cowles Park, E Granby

287-257 S Main St
E Granby  Connecticut  06062
United States
GPS doesn't seem to work to well here. The main parking lot is about 1/2 mile south of the junction of Route 187 and Seymour Rd.

Easy

30%

Moderate

60%

Difficult

10%

Description

Cowles Park in East Grandy offers well over 15 miles of easy to difficult trails. Many of these trails were created for and by mountain bikers but the park also attracts hikers, trail runners and dog walkers.

The singletracks are amazing. They wind through the woods seemingly never going in a straight line for more than a few feet untill you have to make a course adjustment. Mostly smooth, they do offer some technical chllenges and a few short hills.

Expect to return, you won't be able to explore all these trails in one ride.

The only one rule is - Don't Ride When The Trails Are Muddy.

Some of the trails are color coded. But most aren't. There's is a QR Code for the Trail Forks interactive map on the main signboard. 

 

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Local Shops

Benidorm Bikes

Central Wheel

Ridgeline Bikes

Newington Bikes

Submit Comments to Support Connecticut Mountain Biking

Friday, December 15, 2017

Action Alert – Mountain Bikers should Submit Comments Supporting Mountain Biking and More Trail Access to Connecticut’s Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP)

 

Comments must be submitted by Friday, December 28th.

 

Email comments to:

Mail comments to: DEEP SCORP c/o Doug Jann, Environmental Analyst, Bureau of Outdoor Recreation, 79 Elm Street Hartford, CT 06106.

Connecticut’s Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) provides a five-year plan and vision for outdoor recreation. As such, it’s important for mountain biking to be highlighted and promoted in the plan where it is severely lacking at this time. We urge NEMBA members and riders at large to send in comments supporting mountain biking and increased multi-use trail development and access for bikes.

In order to help you submit comments, we are providing a few bullet points you can copy and paste into your response or incorporate into your own words:

1) Increase and improve on the quality of the singletrack trail inventory in the Connecticut state park system. Trail-based recreation needs a larger inventory of quality multi-use trails throughout the state. Increased funding for trail development is important. However, it is equally important to increase the partnerships with trail advocacy organizations, such as NEMBA, to create and maintain new multi-use singletrack trail opportunities.

2) Increase the multi-use singletrack trail connectivity between DEEP Forests and Parks, municipal and private land trusts properties, and water company lands. i.e.: Burlington area trails can be used to interconnect different singletrack trail networks.

3) Create and expand long distance commuter trails that connect different communities and multi-use trail systems to promote environmentally friendly commuting and expand upon economical impacts from trail users. Trails, such as the Airline Trail, Hop River Trail, Richard Goodwin Trail are important connectors to build upon.

4) Increase accessibility for mountain biking on multi-use trails through improved parking lots and trail marking/mapping for trail systems. Modernize and increase wayfinding technology by creating supporting mobile map apps and improving signage and maps. Work on signage that works for all trail users.

5) Increase promotion of outdoor recreation, outdoor events and partner organizations on DEEP’s website to increase local trail use and trail use tourism. Work with NEMBA to identify trail systems that are mountain biking friendly and to promote multi-use trail development across town lines. Read more about [node:title]

Connecticut's NEMBA Chapters respond to Hartford Courant Article

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Below is a Letter to the Editor to the Hartford Courant regarding their September 21, 2016 article "Illegal ATV Trails in State Forests a Growing Problem" written by NEMBA and its five Connecticut NEMBA chapters.

---------------------

Hartford Courant
Letters to the Editor
285 Broad St.
Hartford, CT 06115

September 22, 2016

Dear Editors of the Hartford Courant,

Below is a response written by five Connecticut chapters of the New England Mountain Bike Association regarding Gregory Hladky's September 21, 2016 article, "Illegal ATV Trails in State Forests a Growing Problem." We hope that you publish it in its entirety.

Mountain bikers can be part of the solution

We thank Gregory Hladky for reporting on some of the important issues facing our state forests and public lands in Connecticut, “Illegal ATV Trails in State Forests a Growing Problem.” Indeed, there is a delicate balance between preserving and protecting habitat and providing public access for recreation, and illegal trail use and trail building are serious issues.

The New England Mountain Bike Association (NEMBA) works closely with the Department of Energy & Environmental Protection (DEEP) to steward public trails and improve the quality of trail experience for non-motorized recreation. We have five active NEMBA chapters in Connecticut whose volunteers dedicate 1000’s of hours to maintain trails and educate and assist all trail users. When issues arise that relate to mountain biking, we work closely with local land managers to find solutions. NEMBA opposes unauthorized trail building and works in partnership with DEEP to create legal and sustainable trails. Like hiking, mountain biking is a sustainable and legitimate form of recreation in Connecticut’s state forests and parks.

Unauthorized trail construction is a significant problem but it is nothing new -- probably over half of the state’s trail inventory are legacy trails that were created by informal use. Enforcement is important to help prevent illegal trail building, but perhaps even more important is the need for DEEP to partner with non-motorized trail organizations, such as NEMBA, to improve the quality and quantity of recreational trails so that the general public doesn’t take matters into their own hands. We need both the stick and the carrot.

It is our experience that increasing the amount of legitimate trail use reduces the amount of illegal trail use, and we look forward to increasing our partnership with local land managers to improve and protect the trails for everyone.

Philip Keyes
Executive Director
New England Mountain Bike Association
www.nemba.org
800-576-3622

Cory Stiff
President
Southeastern CT NEMBA

Glenn Vernes
President
Central CT NEMBA

Jon Regan
President
Northwest CT NEMBA

Ryan Tucker
President
Fairfield County NEMBA

Stacey Jimenez
President
Quiet Corner NEMBA

Northern CT

Bigelow Hollow SPark / Nipmuck SForest, Union

Route 171
Union  Connecticut  06076
United States

Easy

10%

Moderate

30%

Difficult

60%

Description

Bigelow Hollow, You'll either love it or you'll hate it. Hidden in the Nipmuck State Forest you'll find some of the tightest, hardpacked, flowy singletrack that New England has to offer. But to find that you will have to ride through some hardcore rock gardens and up steep hills. These rock gardens are not only tricky because of the rock placement but also because they are always damp, even in an August drought.

Want a 3.5 hour loop that'll make your legs turn to Jell-O but will leave your heart wanting more? Drive down the paved park road from the Park Entrance to the 3rd Parking Lot. From there head strait accross the road and follow the white blazed double track park road for 1 mile until you come to a clearing where you will see a small wooden sign with a white blaze that is labeled "East Ridge Trail" follow that. At the conclusion of the East Ridge Trail you will come down a steep down hill that you will want good brakes for. Take a right onto the double track and follow that around the tip of "Breakneck Pond". After that look for "Ridge Trail" which is blazed with Blue and Orange. Warning: one section of that trail is a hike a bike section unless you are a highly skilled trials rider. Follow the Ridge Trail all the way back to the parking lot where you began, but dont forget to enjoy the view along the way. Bonus points if you can find the rabbit rock, a section of slick rock with a small rabbit carved into it.

Directions
I-84 to Exit 73 or 74, then follow Route 190 north to Route 171 east to the park entrance

Review by: David Julien Read more about [node:title]

Local Shops

Downtown Putnam Cyclery

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Northern CT

West Thompson Lake Dam, N Grosvenordale

599 Ravenelle Rd
North Grosvenordale  Connecticut  06255
United States

(860) 923-2982

Easy

50%

Moderate

40%

Difficult

10%

Description

The natural setting surrounding West Thompson Lake is enjoyed year-round. Pleasing views from the dam offer sightseers and photographers a panoramic view of the area. Park Rangers manage the 1,857 acres, in which the forest covers approximately 1,125 of those acres.

There are three main trail systems at West Thompson Lake; yellow, orange and blue. All-in-all there are 17 miles of marked trails to enjoy. While the single track trails range from novice to advanced in areas, there are plenty of cart roads and double track sections that are great for beginners, kids, families and casual riders. 

Parking on the east side of West Thompson Lake is at the Boat Launch at 400 Campground Dr. North Grosverndale, CT.
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Quiet Corner NEMBA's Sunday Weekend Warrior Ride

Friday, April 18, 2014

Start time and location varies. Ride typically takes place on Sunday, but may change to Saturday due to weather or ride location. Details for each week's ride are posted in the Chapter's Facebook Group Forum.

If you are looking to get out in the woods, have some fun, and stretch your skills, feel free to join us. The group will stop to play on skinnies, drops and other features along the way.

If you are looking for fast paced, high mileage, smooth single track, this is probably not the ride for you.

Sample Locations:

Bigelow Hollow - Union, CT
Miller's Pond - Durham, CT
Rockland Preserve - Madison, CT
Case Mountain - Manchester, CT
Lincoln Woods, Lincoln, RI
Arcadia - Exeter, RI
Vietnam, Milford, MA
Foxboro (Gilbert Hills) State Forest - Foxboro, MA
Harold Parker - North Andover, MA
Abram's Rock - Swansea, MA
Highland Mountain Bike Park - Northfield, NH

For More Information

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